OLED laptops – complete list (Best OLED 4K Creator, Gaming models)

OLED laptops – complete list (Best OLED 4K Creator, Gaming models)
By Andrei Girbea, last updated on January 31, 2024

More and more OLED laptops are available in stores these days, of all sizes and kinds.

In this article, I’m going to explain the particularities of the OLED displays available on modern laptops, with their main selling points such as their beautiful image quality with punchy colors, pitch-dark blacks, and unmatched contrast, but also the quirks that you must understand and accept when buying one of these OLED notebooks.

I’ll also reference some of the other types of laptop displays, such as LED IPS and mini LED, for comparison with what OLEDs offer.

That aside, I’ve also compiled down below a few detailed lists of several types of notebooks available with OLED displays, as well as Best of summarized sections for each category. We’ll go over portable and compact OLED ultrabooks, mid-tier laptops for general use and for most budgets, as well as powerful OLED gaming and work computers. We’ll also touch on some of the most recent launches with 3D OLED displays, dual displays, or foldable OLED screens.

OLED technology explained, vs. LED IPS, mini LED

OLED panels have been available on multiple devices for the last year, and while they’re most popular on TVs and smartphones, they’ve also gained ground on notebooks as well.

As of 2023, Samsung makes the majority of OLED panels for laptop use, in sizes varying from 11 to 17 inches, and the price of OLED laptop screens has gone down a fair bit, allowing OEMs to implement this display technology on a wide range of products (including affordable models).

Unlike other display technologies, OLED panels are made from millions of individual self-lit OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes). Each pixel in an OLED display is an individual light diode, and can be controlled independently from the others around.

Thus, OLED panels have millions of individually controllable pixels, unlike LED panels that only offer up to thousands of LED light sources in their best implementations.

This allows the technology to display the most accurate images and content, with excellent blacks, excellent contrast, and none of the blooming/glowing artifacts noticeable with LED panels. The simpler structure of OLED displays also allows them to be implemented in thinner devices, as well as in devices with flexible screens.

LED vs OLED technology

At the same time, though, the diodes are an organic compound and can degrade over time. However, modern panels are guaranteed to work for 30000 hours within specs (which is equivalent to 7 years of use for 12 hours each day), so you shouldn’t be concerned about these diodes degrading over time, as long as you’re not misusing your device. We’re going over the advantages and downsides of OLED technology further down, as well as some indications on how to prevent image retention and burn in.

I’ll also add here that OLED displays are mostly implemented on regular laptop formats these days, but with some notable exceptions:

  • foldable notebooks with flexible OLED screens (which will be followed up by other rollable/foldable/flexible implementations based on the known concepts and prototypes);
  • dual-screen OLED notebooks;
  • glass-free 3D OLED implementations.

I’ll update this section as new technologies become available on retail products (hopefully QD-OLED – Quantum Dot OLED – makes its way into some models as well).

For comparison, LCD LED panels (TN, IPS LED, mini LED, etc) work entirely differently. They utilize a backlighting source that shines light through a complex substrate of RGB liquid crystals in order to create images. The light source differs between panels, from an edge-lit LED source of the cheapest options, to an array of thousands of mini LEDs on the most advanced options.

Most laptops available these days offer IPS LED panels with full-array lighting, but without dimming capabilities. Some of the premium options are available with mini LED panels, which offer higher brightness, better contrast, and better overall image quality than the regular LEDs, through zone dimming control. This dedicated article explains the mini LED technology implemented on some laptops these days.

Down below I’ve included an image of a mini LED panel (left) next to an OLED panel (right), both running an 8K HDR clip. The miniLED gets brighter, but also shows some blooming and burns out some of the details, while the same details are more accurately represented on the OLED. Blacks and Contrast are also superior on the OLED, but this one doesn’t run as bright as the mini LED (600-nits peak HDR – OLED vs 1100-nits peak HDR – miniLED).

mini LED vs OLED on laptops

MiniLED (left) vs OLED (right) with 8K HDR content

We’ll also have a more thorough separate article that compares OLED, IPS, and mini LED displays, with more real-life examples from our reviews.

So is OLED worth it on a laptop? Like with everything else in life, the answer is: it depends. OLEDs look awesome for daily use, movie consumption, and even content editing, but the technology is not without its quirks. Down below I’ll go over the important pros and cons that you need to understand when considering a computer with an OLED panel screen.

Pros and Cons – Why would you want an OLED laptop?

OLED panels are highly versatile on laptops because:

  • offer pretty much the best available image quality for mixed use (daily, work, gaming);
  • they allow for perfect blacks and contrast unmatched by any other display technology available today in laptops (since micro LED is not yet an option);
  • they don’t suffer from vignetting, light bleeding, or blooming/glowing on contrasting elements;
  • emit lower blue-light levels that LCD panels, even at higher brightness, reducing eye strain and fatigue (with TUF certifications);
  • allow the colors to be perceived more vividly at lower brightness levels than on other panel technologies;
  • offer uniform luminosity and colors, alongside wide color gamut coverage (100% DCI-P3) on most variants;
  • offer very fastest response times on all variants (sub 1 ms), as well as excellent 240Hz refresh on a few gaming OLED notebooks.

Pros and Cons – The downsides and quirks of OLED panels on laptops

At the same time, there are some particularities (quirks, cons) that you need to understand about OLEDs before getting one on your laptop:

  • the organic diodes age over time and can suffer from burn-in (image retention), especially if misused (details below);
  • OLED panels are not very bright, at around 400-nits SDR and 600-nits peak HDR;
  • can suffer from black crush and grey banding;
  • some implementations might experience a degree of flickering at lower brightness settings;
  • are only available in glossy implementations;
  • suffer from graininess on touch implementations (but only on the variants with a digitizer layer);
  • most OLED options are only 60-120Hz refresh at this point.

OLED Burn-in is what concerns most people when it comes to OLED panels, but this is mostly impacting older-generation OLEDs, and is less of an issue on the ones available in 2022-2023 (and later). The technology has been refined over time, and most OEMs implement various tricks designed to prevent image retention and pixel degradation, such as pixel shift, pixel refresh, and others.

Nonetheless, I wouldn’t totally dismiss the potential of OLED burn-in even on a modern device, so I advise you not to use an OLED laptop at max brightness for longer periods of time, especially while displaying static content. I’d also use the dark Windows theme and activate interface transparency in Windows 10/11 on an OLED device.

However, my main personal nit with the technology is the graininess that I find very annoying when reading/editing texts – this is only an issue on the touch OLED screens, and not on the non-touch variants, and it’s a side-effect of the way current Samsung-made OLED touchscreens implement the digitizer layer. Some of the available laptops are not using Samsung OLED panels, though, and some don’t implement a digitizer, thus don’t suffer from this graininess nuisance.

That aside, I dislike the fact that OLEDs only come in glossy glary finishes for now, as a matte coating that would not noticeably impact the color volume has not yet been developed. Some manufacturers mention anti-flare finishes on their OLEDs, but even those are reflective. Paired with the limited OLED brightness, these aspects are especially bothering on ultraportable laptops that you plan to use outdoors or in bright light environments.

List of OLED ultrabooks, portable laptops with OLED displays

This section includes all the available OLED ultrabooks and portable laptops with 14-inch and smaller displays.

There are quite a few such options available out there, from most OEMs, starting with affordable models and going all the way up to premium OLED convertibles and 4K OLED ultrabooks, as well as some powerful 14-inch models. However, most of the powerful 14-inchers are detailed in the next sections of creator/gaming models.

I’ve only included the latest devices in this list, and not some of the older ones that have been updated with recent hardware in the meantime (this means you will find in stores some other variants of some of these models, with previous-gen specs).

Furthermore, unless mentioned otherwise, the OLED panels on these laptops are all 400-nits SDR brightness, 600-nits peak HDR brightness, and 100% DCI-P3 gamut coverage.

This first table includes brand-new notebooks launched in 2024, as well as existing designs that were recently updated with 2024 specs. I’ll keep this up to date over the next months, as new options become available in stores.

2024 Models (link to reviews) Type Hardware Screen
Acer Swift GO 14 Ultrabook, budget Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Asus Vivobook S14 OLED Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus Vivobook S15 OLED Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1620 px, 120Hz
Asus Vivobook S16 OLED Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Asus Zenbook S 13 OLED Ultrabook, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 13.3″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Asus Zenbook 14 OLED Ultrabook, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus Zenbook Duo OLED Ultrabook, dual display Intel Core Ultra H + Arc dual 14″ OLEDs, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
FHD 60Hz or or 2.8K 120Hz
Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 13.4″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-reflect, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Dell XPS 14 Ultrabook, Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4050 30W
14.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-reflect, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
HP Spectre x360 2-in-1 14 Ultrabook, 2 in 1 Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Lenovo Yoga 9i Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz or
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Lenovo Yoga Pro 7i,
Slim
Pro 7i
Ultrabook, Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4050 65W
14.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Lenovo Yoga 7i,
Slim 7i
Ultrabook, budget  Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
FHD 1920 x 1200 px, 60Hz
Lenovo Yoga Book 9i Ultrabook, 2-in-1
dual screens
Intel Core Ultra U + Arc 13.3″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
dual 2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Business, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2800 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga Business, premium 2-in-1 Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz, 500-nits
MSI Prestige 13 AI Evo Ultrabook, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 13.3″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book4 Pro Ultrabook, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz

And here are a couple more compact and portable OLED laptops released in the previous years.

Model (link to reviews) Type Hardware Screen
Acer Swift 3 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core H + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz, without digitizer
Acer Swift GO 14 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core H + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz, without digitizer
Acer Swift X 14 Ultrabook, Creator Intel Core H,
up to RTX 4050
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus ExpertBook B9 B9403 Business Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch or non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Asus VivoBook 14 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core U or H + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Asus ZenBook S 13 Ultrabook, premium AMD Ryzen U + Radeon 13.3″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Asus ZenBook S 13 Flip Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core P + Iris Xe, 13.3″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Asus ZenBook S 13 2023 Ultrabook, premium Intel Core U + Iris Xe 13.3″ OLED, 16:9 format, semi-glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Asus ZenBook 14, 2024 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core Ultra + Arc 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch or non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus ZenBook 14, 2023 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core P + Iris Xe,
AMD Ryzen H + Radeon
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch or non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Asus ZenBook Flip 14 Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core H + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Asus ZenBook 14X Ultrabook, premium Intel Core H,
up to RTX 4050
14.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus ZenBook Fold 17 Foldable Intel Core U + Iris Xe 17.3″ OLED, 4:3 format, glossy, touch,
2.5K 2560 x 1920 px, 60Hz
Dell XPS 13 Plus Ultrabook, premium Intel Core P + Iris Xe 13.4″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-reflect, touch,
3.5K 3456 x 2160 px, 90Hz, without digitizer
HP Elite Dragonfly Ultrabook, premium Intel Core U + Iris Xe 13.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
HP Envy x360 13.3 Ultrabook, 2-in-1,
mid-tier
Intel Core U + Iris Xe 13.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
HP Spectre x360 13.5 Ultrabook, 2-in-1,
premium
Intel Core U + Iris Xe 13.3″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 3000 x 2000 px, 60Hz
HP Pavilion Plus 14 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core U + Iris Xe
AMD Ryzen U + Radeon
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Lenovo IdeaPad Slim 5 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core U/P + Iris Xe
AMD Ryzen U + Radeon
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
FHD+ 1920 x 1200 px, 60Hz
Lenovo Chromebook Duet Chromebook, tablet Snapdragon + Adreno 13.3″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, touch,
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz
Lenovo Tab P11 Pro Tablet Snapdragon + Adreno 11.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.5K 2560 x 1600 px, 60Hz, 350-nits
Lenovo Slim 9i Ultrabook, premium Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Lenovo Yoga 9i Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Lenovo Slim 7i (Yoga 6) Ultrabook, mid-tier Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
FHD+ 1920 x 1200 px, 60Hz
Lenovo Yoga 7i Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core U/P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
FHD+ 1920 x 1200 px, 60Hz
Lenovo Yoga Book 9i Ultrabook, 2-in-1
dual screens
Intel Core U + Iris Xe 13.3″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
dual 2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Business, premium Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad T14s Business Intel Core P + Iris Xe
AMD Ryzen U Pro + Radeon
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold Foldable Intel Core U + Iris Xe 16.3″ OLED, 5:4 format, glossy, touch,
2.5K 2560 x 2024 px, 60Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga Business, 2-in-1 Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz, 500-nits
Lenovo ThinkPad Z13 Business AMD Ryzen U Pro + Radeon 13.3″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 60Hz
LG Gram Style 14 Ultrabook, premium Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-glare, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book3 Pro Ultrabook, premium Intel Core P + Iris Xe 14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 90Hz
Samsung Galaxy Chromebook Chromebook, 2-in-1 Intel Core U + Iris Xe 13.3″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, touch,
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz, 350-nits

Best portable OLED laptops

A few of these stand out from the crowd.

Among the budget laptop options, the ChromeBook Duet tablet is unmatched at around $400. It’s a Chromebook, though, so not necessarily for everyone.

In the Windows space, good mid-tier options are the Acer Swift GO 14, the Asus VivoBook 14 and ZenBook 14, the HP Pavilion Plus 14, or the Lenovo IdeaPad Slim 5, all 14 inchers with similar OLED 2.8K 90-120Hz displays and specs.

Moving on, the HP Spectre x360 and the Lenovo Yoga 9i are the best premium 2-in-1 OLED ultrabooks money could buy, if a 2-in-1 convertible format is what you’re after.

And then there’s also this unique sub-class of foldable and dual-screen OLED devices, with the Yoga Book 9i, the ZenBook Duo and ZenBook Fold, and ThinkPad Fold being the prominent members. I’d expect more of these will be released over time.

The ThinkPad X1 Fold is one of the very few fodable OLED laptops announced so far

The ThinkPad X1 Fold is one of the very few fodable OLED laptops announced so far

As for the premium clamshell thin-and-light OLED laptops, the Dell XPS 13 and XPS 14, the HP Elite DragonFly, the Lenovo Slim 9i, and ThinkPad X1 Carbon are my favorite options, each with specific design particularities and features.

Finally, there’s also this interesting sub-segment of powerful 14-inch laptops with OLED displays and beefier components than on the other options, such as the Acer Swift X 14 and the Asus ZenBook 14X, but especially the Asus ZenBook Pro 14 that can be configured up to an Intel Core i9 with RTX 4070 graphics.

The ZenBook Pro 14 remains among the most powerful OLED compact notebooks available in 2024, but there are a handful of other options to consider as well, such as the new Asus ROG Zephyrus G14, the Lenovo Legion Slim 5 or the HP Omen Transcend 14. These are detailed in the next section of the article.

asus zenbook pro14 general

The ZenBook Pro 14 is one of the most powerful OLED compact laptops of this generation

List of OLED Gaming laptops and 4K Creator/Workstation models

This section includes all the full-size notebooks available these days with OLED panels, and I’ve split the options into a few different segments:

  • Ultrabooks – compact and lightweight laptops with lower-power specs, made for daily use and multitasking;
  • Creator laptops – compact performance laptops with powerful specs, made for multitasking and professional creative work;
  • Workstation laptops – sleeper work laptops, with 4K OLED panel, powerful specs and non-gaming designs;
  • Gaming laptops – powerful gaming machines with uncompromised specs and performance.

Once more, I’ve only included the latest iteration of this series in this list, and unless mentioned otherwise, the OLED panels on these devices are 400-nits SDR brightness, 600-nits peak HDR brightness, and 100% DCI-P3 gamut coverage.

This first table includes brand-new notebooks launched in 2024, as well as existing designs that were recently updated with 2024 specs. I’ll keep this up to date over the next months, as new options become available in stores.

2024 Models (link to reviews) Type Hardware Screen
Acer Swift GO 16 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4050
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Acer Swift X 14 Creator, Gaming Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4070
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus Vivobook Pro 15 OLED Ultrabook, Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4060
15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1620 px, 120Hz
Asus ROG Zephyrus G14 Creator, Gaming AMD Ryzen HS,
up to RTX 4070 90W
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-glare, non-touch,
2.5K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus ROG Zephyrus G16 Creator, Gaming Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4090 130W
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-glare, non-touch,
2.5K 2560 x 1600 px, 240Hz
Dell XPS 16 Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4070 60W
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-reflect, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 90Hz
HP Omen Transcend 14 Gaming, mid-tier Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4070 105W
14″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
HP Spectre x360 2-in-1 16 Ultrabook, 2 in 1 Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
LG Gram 16 2-in-1 Ultrabook, 2 in 1 Intel Core Ultra + Arc 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
LG Gram Pro 16 Ultrabook, Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 3050
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
MSI Prestige 16 AI Evo Ultrabook, premium Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
MSI Prestige 16 AI Studio Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4070 55W
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
Razer Blade 16 Creator, Gaming Intel Core HX,
up to RTX 4070 140W
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
QHD+ 2560 x 1600 px, 240Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book4 Pro Ultrabook Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book4 Pro 360 Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core Ultra H + Arc 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book4 Ultra Creator Intel Core Ultra H,
up to RTX 4070
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz

And here are a couple more OLED laptops released in the previous years.

Older Models (link to reviews) Type Hardware Screen
Acer Swift Edge 16 OLED Ultrabook, premium AMD Ryzen U + Radeon 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz, without digitizer
Acer Swift GO 16 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core H + Iris Xe 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 60Hz, without digitizer
Alienware M15 Gaming Intel Core H + up to RTX 3070 140W 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
4K 3840 x 2160 px, 60Hz, without digitizer
Asus VivoBook Go 15 Ultrabook, mid-range AMD Ryzen U + Radeon 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz, without digitizer
Asus VivoBook Go 15 Ultrabook, mid-range AMD Ryzen U + Radeon 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz, without digitizer
Asus VivoBook Pro 15 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core H + up to RTX 3050 50W
AMD Ryzen H + up to RTX 3050 50W
15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1620 px, 120Hz
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz
Asus VivoBook S 16X Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core H + Iris Xe
AMD Ryzen HX + Radeon
16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz, without digitizer
Asus VivoBook S 16 Flip Ultrabook, 2-in-1 AMD Ryzen U + Radeon 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 60Hz
Asus VivoBook Pro 16X Creator Intel Core HX + up to RTX 4070 120W 16″ OLED (optional 3D OLED), 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz, without digitizer
Asus ZenBook Pro 16X Creator Intel Core HX + up to RTX 4080 ??W 16″ OLED (optional 3D OLED), 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Asus ZenBook Pro 14 Creator, premium Intel Core H,
up to RTX 4070 80W
14.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Asus ZenBook Pro DUO 14 Creator, two screens Intel Core H,
up to RTX 4060 65W
14.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz – main display
IPS secondary display
Asus ProArt StudioBook Pro 16 Creator Intel Core HX + up to RTX 4070 95W 16″ OLED (optional 3D OLED), 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Dell Inspiron 16 2-in-1 Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core P + up to MX550 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
Dell XPS 15 Creator, premium Intel Core H + up to RTX 3050Ti 40W 15.6″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-reflect, touch,
3.5K 3456 x 2160 px, 60Hz
Gigabyte Aero 16 Creator, premium Intel Core HX + up to RTX 4070 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, non-touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz, without digitizer (??)
HP Envy x360 15 Ultrabook, 2 in 1,
mid-tier
Intel Core P + Iris Xe
AMD Ryzen U + Radeon
15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, touch,
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz
HP Envy 16 Creator, premium Intel Core H + up to RTX 3060 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
HP ZBook Studio Creator, Workstation Intel Core HK + up to RTX A5500 80W 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
Lenovo Legion Slim 5 Gaming, mid-tier AMD Ryzen HS,
up to RTX 4060 105W
14.5″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-glare, non-touch,
2.8K 2880 x 1800 px, 120Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad P16 Workstation Intel Core HX + up to RTX A5500 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad P16s Ultrabook AMD Ryzen U + Radeon 780m 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
Lenovo ThinkPad Z16 Creator, Workstation AMD Ryzen H + Radeon RX 6500M 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
4K 3840 x 2400 px, 60Hz
LG Gram Style 16 Ultrabook, premium Intel Core P + Iris Xe 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, anti-glare, non-touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz, without digitizer
LG Gram Ultraslim 15 Ultrabook, mid-range Intel Core P + Iris Xe 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, anti-glare, non-touch,
FHD 1920 x 1080 px, 60Hz, without digitizer
MSI GE67 Raider Gaming Intel Core HX + up to RTX 3080Ti 175W 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, non-touch,
QHD 2560 x 1440 px, 240Hz, without digitizer
Razer Blade 15 Creator, Gaming Intel Core H + up to RTX 3080Ti 105W 15.6″ OLED, 16:9 format, glossy, touch,
QHD 2560 x 1440 px, 240Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book3 Pro Ultrabook Intel Core P + Iris Xe 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book3 Pro 360 Ultrabook, 2-in-1 Intel Core P + Iris Xe 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz
Samsung Galaxy Book3 Ultra Creator Intel Core H + up to RTX 4070 16″ OLED, 16:10 format, glossy, touch,
3.2K 3200 x 2000 px, 120Hz

Best OLED Gaming laptops and Work computers

A few of these stand out.

There are no cheap full-size OLED options out there, but if you’re after something competitively priced, I’d look into the Acer Swift Go 16 at a lower budget, the balanced Asus VivoBook Pro 15 models, or the ultralight LG Gram Ultraslim 15.

Among premium ultraportables with a large display, the LG Gram Style 16 and the Samsung Galaxy Book4 Pro 16 are hardly matched by anything else.

Moving up, the Dell XPS remains an excellent all-purpose premium laptop, both in the previous XPS 15 design that you can find for bargain prices these days, as well as in the new 2024 XPS 16 generation, with the updated design and more powerful hardware.

The XPS 15 is still the best-balanced premium OLED laptop on the market

The XPS 15 is still the best-balanced premium OLED laptop on the market

And then there’s the new 2024 Asus ROG Zephyrus G16, still a compact and lightweight format, but with beefy specs (up to Core Ultra 9 and RTX 4090) and a modern 240Hz OLED display. The same panel is also offered by Razer on their Blade 16, which in theory is a beefier design than the Zephyrus G16, but in reality can only be specced up to an RTX 4070 dGPU in the OLED configurations, as the higher GPU options are only paired with a mini LED display.

I’ll also mention the glass-free 3D OLED technology offered (for now) only on a few Asus laptops such as the ZenBook Pro 16X and the ProArt StudioBook 16. It looks surreal and better than I expected, as explained in this separate article on 3D OLED.

And then there’s also a newer breed of performance and gaming laptop in compact chassis, such as the lightweight and mid-powered ROG Zephyrus G14 and Acer Swift X 14, but also the more affordable Lenovo Legion Slim 5 and HP OMEN Transcend 14. These can be specced with RTX 4060 and even RTX 4070 dGPUs (except for the Legion).

As for the larger screen gaming-capable OLED laptops, I already mentioned the Blade and the Zephyrus, but the older MSI GE67 Raider is fairly interesting as well, even if it was not updated to the latest specs.

I’ll also add that Alienware used to offer OLED gaming machines as well at some point, but ditched them in the latest hardware iterations. Thus, the OLED Alienware m15s that you might still find out there are hardly worth purchasing anymore, unless they’re greatly discounted.

If money's no object, the Razer Blade OLED is an unmatched premium OLED notebook

If money’s no object, the Razer Blade OLED is an unmatched premium OLED notebook

All in all, that’s about it on this journey through OLED laptops.

We’re constantly looking to update these lists and the information on our pages, but if you spot anything that should be mentioned in this post and is not, please let us know in the comments section down below. I’m also interested in your thoughts and feedback on these OLED screens available on these modern notebooks, so get in touch.

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Author at Ultrabookreview.com
Article by: Andrei Girbea
Andrei Girbea is a Writer and Editor-in-Chief here at Ultrabookreview.com. I write about mobile technology, laptops and computers in general. I've been doing it for more than 15 years now. I'm a techie with a Bachelor's in Computer Engineering. I mostly write reviews and thorough guides here on the site, with some occasional columns and first-impression articles.

6 Comments

  1. Ed

    February 5, 2023 at 9:48 pm

    I see you list the Gigabyte Aero 16 as having a touch display. Are you sure this is true? I was researching this model as a potential option for an OLED without a digitizer.

    Thanks

    • Andrei Girbea

      February 6, 2023 at 12:23 pm

      Hi, sry, I think that was an error on my part, but I'm not entirely sure. I don't have contacts with Gigabyte and haven't reviewed the laptop, but it looks like this indeed is a non-touch without the digitizer layer. I would double-check with Gigabyte support if possible, just to be sure.

      • Aerowing

        February 11, 2024 at 10:09 pm

        Im writing on this device right now and can confirm, no touch screen. Amazing screen!

  2. Altandmain

    August 11, 2023 at 7:40 pm

    Andrei, any thoughts on the new Samsung Octa display?

    zdnet.com/article/samsung-display-brings-advanced-smartphone-oled-touch-tech-to-notebooks/

    It looks like it won't have the issues that touchscreen OLEDs currently have.

    • Andrei Girbea

      August 14, 2023 at 1:16 pm

      Sounds interesting. We'll have to see in in real-use before drawing any conclusions, though

  3. Andrew

    February 6, 2024 at 7:11 am

    "suffer from graininess on touch implementations (but only on the variants with a digitizer layer)"
    This is a worry for me, I want the HP x360 Spectre 14" or Lenovo 9i 2-in-1, but I need to see the screens side by side to see if they have the grainy/screen door effect.

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