Ultrabook reviews, guides and comparisons

Ultrabooks vs regular laptops/notebooks in 2015: similarities and differences

By Andrei Girbea - @ andreigirbea , updated on July 7, 2015

Ultrabooks are a fairly fresh breed of portable computers. They are slim, light, sleek and fast, that’s why many, including their creators at Intel, say that they will soon become more popular than ‘’regular’’ laptops.

The “old” classic laptops still have some aces down their sleeves though when facing the new kids in town. However, with a more and more diverse range of ultrabooks hitting the shelves, I’m sure many of you are at least wondering if you should pick one of these over a regular notebook or not.

That’s why, in the following lines I will tell you several of the important aspects you need to know about what ultrabooks and standard laptops have in common and more importantly, about what sets them apart.

So let’s get going, but before we start, don’t forget that if you have any questions or things to add to this article, I’ll be waiting for your comments at the end of the post and I’ll be around to reply as well.

Ultrabooks and Laptops – the definitions

Standard laptops, as probably most of you know already, are mobile personal computers and come in a wide range of forms and sizes. They can sport displays between 10 to 20 inches in diagonal, they can weigh anywhere from 2 to 18 pounds and bundle a multitude of hardware configurations and features.

Ultrabooks are laptops after all, but not all laptops are ultrabooks.

Ultrabooks are just a special kin of laptops

15.6 inch laptops are perhaps the most popular these days in their classes, as they are powerful enough to deal just fine with all your everyday activities (browsing, chatting, listening to music, watching movies, playing some games), but also light and portable enough to be carried around when needed.

Ultrabooks are a “special” breed of laptops. In many ways, they look and behave more or less like regular notebooks. But they do have to meet a set of criteria in order to get the “ultrabook” title, criteria set by Intel, who in fact established this class of computers a while ago.

Long story short, ultrabooks need to be slim (18 mm thick or less for machines with displays under 14 inches and 23 mm for those with larger screens), need to bundle Intel’s ULV hardware platforms and fast storage (SSDs or a mix of HDD and SSD storage), need to be able to run for at least 5 hours on a charge and support several Intel technologies, like their Anti-Theft or Identity Protection Technology.

Ultrabooks vs laptops – the similarities

An ultrabook is basically a select type of laptop and therefore there are many similarities between these new ultraportable computers and ‘’regular’’ notebooks.

Practically, with a few exceptions which will be detailed later on, ultrabooks and standard laptops share many common traits, like the shape and form-factor, the standard body elements (screen, keyboard, ports, hardware) and their overall functionality. Much like most laptops, ultrabooks run Windows and all the software compatible with Microsoft’s OS, from basic browsers or Office programs, to more complex applications or games.

Ultrabooks should not be considered laptop competitors, but rather laptop peers.

Ultrabooks should not be considered laptop competitors, but rather laptop peers

In other words, ultrabooks are thinner, more powerful and longer lasting versions of ultrabooks. But you can use them for more or less the same things as you would use a normal laptop.

Ultrabooks vs laptops – the differences

There are many tiny details that set these two sides apart though, and I’ll tell you more about those in the next section of this laptops vs ultrabooks comparison, that speaks about the differences between the two.

Design and looks

From starters, ultrabooks have one thing on their side when compared to the vast majority of laptops: they are thinner and at the same time, lighter. Let’s take the 13.3 inch segment for instance, where most ultrabooks weigh less than 3 pounds and are up to 18 mm thin, while regular portable laptops are thicker and tip the scale at 4 pounds or above, with only few exceptions among premium business notebooks.

The same thing goes for 14 and 15.6 inch ultrabooks, as you can see in the clip below.

Intel actually does not impose a weight limit for ultrabooks, but does impose one when it comes to their thickness, as mentioned before. Up to 14 inch ultrabooks have to measure 18 mm or less in their thickest point (0.7 inch), while larger 14 and 15.6 inch ultrabooks can go up to 21 mm (0.8 inch) in thickness. If there’s a touchscreen on a particular ultrabooks, the limit grows to 23 mm (0.9 inches).

There’s nothing imposed in terms of build quality or materials used for the cases either, but most ultrabooks impress with their looks and overall high-quality finishing. In fact, magnesium, aluminum, carbon fiber, glass and other premium materials are quite often found on ultrabooks, while that’s not as common on regular laptops, unless we’re talking about the higher-end options.


Lifting the lid covers, you’ll notice that most ultrabooks offer rather shallow keyboards, due to their thin silhouette, and here’s where classic laptops can step in front of their competitors, as there’s more space to accommodate a better keyboard on them.

But that’s not a common rule, as there are plenty of ultrabooks with good keyboard, and even more laptops with awful ones. That aside, it’s worth noting that you’ll get backlit keyboards on most ultrabooks, while on laptops, that’s a feature only reserved for the premium models.

Hardware and performances

And then there’s the hardware inside. While ultrabooks need to be built on Intel ULV platforms and since their are so slim, usually pack integrated graphics (although there are some to feature discrete chips as well), there are way more configurations available for the classic notebooks, that stretch from low-power entry level setups, all the way to the beefiest quad-core processors and dedicated graphics solutions  found in the latest gaming rigs.

Ultrabooks are fairly snappy as well, as those ULV platforms can push good performances, especially when coupled with a fair amount of RAM and fast storage options, which is usually a bottleneck in a standard modern computer (regular hard-drives are quite slow, as opposed to the SSDs or hybrid solutions found on ultrabooks). Even so, ULV platforms are meant to deliver a good balance between power and efficiency, that’s why you will find plenty of stronger configurations on laptops, created the deliver the best performances, with little concern to battery life.

Battery life

As a result, ultrabooks tend to last a lot more on a charge than the average laptops will. In fact, Intel’s regulations state that IvyBridge or older ultrabooks need to run for at least 5 hours on a charge, while newer Haswell ultrabooks need to meet more strict rules: 9 hours of idle, 6+ hours of video playing and at least 7 days of Standby time. That’s why Haswell ultrabooks deliver some impressive battery life results, as you’ll see from this post.

In order to save space, the batteries are in most cases encased and non-removable on ultrabooks and so are the main hardware components. That’s not the case with regular laptops, where the battery, memory or storage units are quite easily accessible and replaceable. But that should not really bother you as an average user, although you might not like that you can’t remove the battery from your machine when using it pluged in for a longer period of time. Except for that you should be fine, and if you really want to, you can access the hardware on most ultrabooks as well, it just takes a bit more effort and some proper screw-drivers.

Other details

With ultrabooks being so thin, it’s worth mentioning that they can get quite hot when pushed, especially those versions with dedicated graphics. The metallic bodies have a huge role in how we perceive this aspect, as they drive the heat towards us, the users.

Besides all these, you should know that ultrabooks have to boot quickly and resume from sleep in under 7 seconds, that’s why the fast storage options are a must here. And they also need to implement a bunch of Intel imposed security technologies, like I already mentioned in the beginning of this post, that will keep the content on your machine safe in case the ultrabooks gets stolen and will even help you locate and maybe retrieve the unit.

When speaking about ports and connectivity options, while you do get a basic set of options on ultrabooks, there’s usually not enough room for all the things you might be already used to from a standard laptop. And that’s because there’s less room on ultrabooks for these, so as a result, some features are either cut off or replaced with their miniaturized versions.

As for the screens, well, there are several dozens ultrabooks available these days in stores, with displays ranging from 11.6 inch in diagonal, all the way to standard 15.6 inchers. Most premium options feature some high quality screens, with IPS panels, high-density matrices and even touchscreens on many of the latest units (in fact, touchscreens are more or less a given on Haswell ultrabooks).

Regular laptops stretch from tiny units, with 7 or 8 inch displays, all the way to multimedia behemoths with 20 inch screens and you get plenty of panels and screen types to choose from on all these devices.


You can get a laptop these days for anywhere from $100 to several thousand dollars.

The cheapest ultrabooks sell for more, around $400 or so, with the premium versions starting at $1000 and up. But there are quite a few good picks that sell for somewhere between $500 and $800.

Even so, an ultrabook will be more expensive than a fairly similar specced laptop, and that’s normal, given all the things they have to offer (the slim body, the fancy craftsmanship, the long battery life, the security features, etc).

Wrap-up – ultrabook or laptop – what will it be?

All those ultrabook imposed criteria apart, there is one thing that sets these two classes apart: variety.

Regular laptops have been around for many years and that’s why there are hundreds of them for us to choose from, with all sorts of shapes, configurations and features.

Ultrabooks are playing catch-up, and while several years ago we only had a handful of ultraportables available, they now cover a vaster range of sizes and expectations, with ultrabooks great for college and school, gaming ultrabooks or convertible hybrids with touchscreens. In fact, there are many good ultrabooks listed in stores these days, and if you want to know more about them, this curated list of my favorite models is the best place to start.

Laptops can come in a bunch of different sizes, being targeted towards a more varied audience.

Laptops come in a bunch of different sizes, being targeted towards a larger audience

Bottom point, ultrabooks are just a special type of laptops. They are designed with portability and looks in mind and they are fast enough to cope with the everyday tasks. However, a potential buyer can only choose between a limited number of such devices right now, while with laptops, there’s a wider pool to pick from. On top of that, ultrabooks are still fairly expensive.

Ultra-portable laptops are clearly the way to go though. With the hardware getting faster and more efficient, manufacturers will create even sleeker and lighter machines in the next years. And all of them will get more affordable and more accessible for the average Joe.

That might not yet be the case right now, but it’s surely going to happen sooner than later.

In the end, if you’re still undecided between classic laptops or an ultrabook, perhaps you should also take a look at these two other posts here on the site, one listing the best ultrabooks you can find in shops these days and the other listing the ultra-portable alternatives you could consider if you’re not yet ready to get in bed with ultrabook.

And if you have any comments, questions or things you want to add to this post, don’t hesitate to leave your replies below.

Andrei Girbea, aka Mike, Editor-in-Chief and a huge fan of mobile computers. Since 2007, I've only owned smaller than 12.5" laptops and I've been testing tens, if not hundreds of mini laptops. You'll find mostly reviews and guides written by me here on the site.


  1. James

    July 26, 2013 at 2:04 am

    Hi. I’m getting ready to go off to college and am prepared to buy a new laptop/ultrabook to bring with me. I’m looking for something that has a decent amount of memory and computing power, but I’m not looking to really break the bank (nothing much above $1000). I will need something that is portable, since I’ll be lugging it around campus quite a bit, but I don’t want to sacrifice a lot of power, which it sounds like I could risk doing should I go with an ultrabook. I’m not looking to do a ton of gaming or run a lot of heavy-duty programs, but I don’t want to get stuck with a behemoth of a processor. Do you guys have any recommendations on makes or models that I should look into?

    • Andrei Girbea

      July 28, 2013 at 1:08 pm

      James, pretty much any ultrabooks with an i5 processor should do for you. If you can squeeze in something with an SSD, even better.

  2. Vladislav Bezhenar

    July 26, 2013 at 6:21 am

    Hello there,

    I am looking for a good music making laptop. Specifically for making beats,recording,mastering, etc…

    Would an Ultrabook, or a regular laptop be a better choice?

    Which computer would be good for that?

  3. Poida

    August 1, 2013 at 8:48 pm

    Mixed metaphors, mangled English, pointless drivel. Make your point, move on.

  4. Bob

    September 2, 2013 at 10:25 am

    Thanks for writing this article. I now better understand the differences. I’ve decided to go for a regular laptop and install an 250GB SSD . Running with Ubuntu it will be as fast as an ultrabook (I think) plus it will allow me to upgrade in the future (i.e. if I need more RAM or bigger hardrive). Some of these ultrabooks don’t allow you to upgrade everything, or repair parts. This is a shame as I’d like a computer for the next 6-7 years. As far as I can see the only major advantage of an ultrabook is weight. I’m big and heavy, so I think I’ll survive :-) Otherwise when I move about for work I’ll use my e-reader (or if I get one a tablet). These ultrabooks might look cool, but I think I’d rather go with the flexibility and save my money for future upgrades. Thanks again for an informative article that allowed me to think through my decisions.

  5. chandan kumar

    September 3, 2013 at 4:16 pm

    Which is best for buy ultrabook or laptop.i am doing btech from computer science engineering….plz suggest me immediately….

  6. mahesh

    September 18, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    laptop with 3rd gen ci5/750gbHDD/8gb ram/2gb gr card vs ultrabook 3rd Gen Ci5/ 4GB/ 750GB 24GB SSD

    which one will be faster in terms of boot time, launching heavy programs and shut down? will the ultrabook ssd be able to make up for less ram and no graphic memory?

  7. yaw hon

    December 1, 2013 at 7:38 am

    I want to know the pros amd cons of both

  8. P Joshi

    December 9, 2013 at 7:51 am

    I want to buy lightweight, high-performance & reliable laptops for top management with docking arrangement & VGA port for projection. It should be capable for long continuous working of 9-10 hours with minimum heat & sound. I want to know whether Ultrabook is a better option or I should look for traditional business laptops, which are sturdy and not very good looking. Please advise.

    • Andrei Girbea

      December 13, 2013 at 7:01 pm

      P, look at the Lenovo ThinkPad X240 with the extended battery. It should do the trick.

  9. rodel

    December 11, 2013 at 7:12 pm

    I want gaming laptop or ultrabook but my money is 600usd$. Pls. Help me what the best model I buy?thank u so much.

    • Andrei Girbea

      December 13, 2013 at 7:07 pm

      Look for an Ivy Bridge Acer Aspire M5. You might find one with a Core i5 and the 640MLE (14 incher) or 640M (15 incher) chip in that budget

  10. Harjot

    January 16, 2014 at 8:04 am

    Requirments for the laptop of my choice :

    15.6″ inches screen (about 1366 x 768res)
    Able to handle some minor HD games.
    might be fit for multimedia.
    Must have a good backlit Keyboard.

    -I don’t carry my laptop with me most of the time-
    but I’ll consider having a portable laptop.

    The problem is, my budget is only about $500 USD.
    Is there a laptop that fits the description I gave for only about $500?

  11. sunny mittal

    February 12, 2014 at 6:17 am

    m little bit confused as i want to buy a laptop rs under 40,000 which should i buy…can.u suggest me and its good if u tell me in dell

    • amit

      March 18, 2014 at 1:41 pm

      Please can u suggest me the best one ultra-book with company name and model name for the same.

    • Anty_idiot

      August 23, 2014 at 5:51 pm

      I would like to buy something, please advice me. Sunny, Amit and other morons. If you do not provide more details it is impossible to give you any hint.
      Just go to mediamarkt, or any other electronics shop, take the first laptop from the shelf and buy it.

  12. Manoj jangra

    March 19, 2014 at 7:07 am

    Which is best to buy notebook or an ultrabook plz tell me

  13. Nagu

    April 14, 2014 at 5:50 pm

    I want to buy one gadget..which one u can suggest to me???laptop or ultra book??plz rpl to my email….
    thank you sir..

  14. kenneth mwagomba

    April 21, 2014 at 2:35 pm

    I need a laptop with the following specifications:
    1. screen size horizontal: 14Inches by Vertical:15Inches
    2. horizontal 12.6 inches and vertical 14 inches

  15. Ginny Wilkerson

    May 1, 2014 at 2:55 am

    I wish there was a website where I could put in my specs and then several choices and price ranges will come up.
    I know that I use my lap top for ministry, which means I need to be able to display song lyrics for people to read so they can sing along which means i need either Power point or some kind of software that will display songs for people to sing.
    It needs to have a good sound system for home use.
    It needs to have also good resolution for when I do my home group Hebrew study for when we watch videos.
    it must be versatile in that way.
    I carry around a very heavy laptop with a logitech laptop pad with speakers and cooling fan on it.
    Any suggestions? I want to go lighter but not sacrifice quality.

    • Andrei Girbea

      May 6, 2014 at 1:45 pm

      Creating such a tool is a bit tricky.

      Now, for what you need, most ultrabooks will due. I suggest looking at the Lenovo Yoga line, which is quite versatile. You could use the laptop in Stand/Tent modes for your groups, that should come in handy. You get either the older Yoga 13 ultrabooks, or the newer Yoga 2 Pro.

      Speakers are somewhat problematic on these devices. As they are thin, there’s not enough room for proper chambers, so I’d suggest going for a mini Boom Speaker you could connect to the laptop via USB. You’ll find those on Amazon and Ebay for 20 to 50 bucks.

  16. ydesai

    May 20, 2014 at 8:16 am

    I’d like to know what would you prefer laptop or ultra book if you were a Bachelors in Computer Application Student.. Whose major requirement is to work with eclipse,. Net Framework, Photoshop etc !!

    • Andrei Girbea

      May 21, 2014 at 3:46 pm

      Probably a laptop, if you don’t want something very portable. Otherwise, an ultrabooks, but get an as fast as processor possible and as much RAM.

  17. Satish

    May 27, 2014 at 9:05 am

    It seems the major difference between an ultra book and a laptop is the processor. Can you highlight the major differences between the two types of processors. It would be helpful if you can compare them with desktp processors and tablet processor like the one used in Surface 3.

    • Andrei Girbea

      May 27, 2014 at 11:31 am

      The Surface 3 Pro uses the same kind of processors you’ll also find in laptops.

      It’s impossible for me to compare all the existing processors. You should look for reviews of the exact models you’re interested in and have the numbers side by side. Roughly, things go like this:

      Atom processors (low power, high efficiency)
      Core Y Series
      Core U Series
      full voltage Mobile CPUs

      But that’s just to make a general idea.

      • marlyn

        July 25, 2014 at 11:04 pm

        Sir , Can you give me an idea which brand of laptops best for processing of geotagging applications?.

  18. sakiya

    May 29, 2014 at 12:29 am

    “there’s less room on ultrabooks for these, so as a result, some features are either cut off or replaced with their miniaturized versions.”
    – what features exactly are cut from ultrabooks? Which are miniaturized? How?

    • Andrei Girbea

      May 29, 2014 at 11:13 am

      Ports, that paragraph is about ports and connectors

  19. Deborah

    August 19, 2014 at 6:10 pm

    The hinges on most laptops are pathetic. Are they better on the Ultrabooks since they are lighter? Which brand has the best hinges in your opinion. Any help would be appreciated.

    • Andrei Girbea

      August 20, 2014 at 2:23 pm

      Ahhh, that’s a tough question. I’d say most of the premium laptops have sturdy hinges, mainly because they are made from metal and so are the bodies/lid cover. Going for a device with a long single hinge (like the Macbooks, Asus Zenbooks, Dell XPS line, etc) is also going to narrow the chance of it breaking down. And one final thing to consider: go with something that has a strong bezel around the screen. With most laptops, hinges are fixed behind this plastic strip around the screen and I’ve seen cases where it broke, but not on higher end devices.

    • iorr61

      April 28, 2015 at 3:07 pm

      Deb, I hope you found a good one. I had an HP Ultrabook, a hinge broke very shortly after 1-year. After finding that broken hinges are a popular topic, and HP not standing up to it (at least in my case), I bought a Lenovo Ultrabook. Lo and behold, very shortly after 1-year, a hinge broke. Neither break was from abuse. I, too, would like to find an Ultra with reliable hinges, or a manufacturer who will stand behind theirs w/ out buying an extended warranty.

  20. Anand m

    February 5, 2015 at 1:57 pm

    hi im little bit confused as i want to buy a laptop rs under 25,000 which should ibuy…can.u suggest me and its good if u tell me in lenovo

  21. Anthony

    April 18, 2015 at 10:23 am

    Could you advise me on what laptop/ultrabook I should get my son .He is starting high school next year and needs to bring a laptop. I have a daughter who has an acer with a 12 inch screen which is small but heavy. They have to carry this to and from school,can you advise something better alternative.

  22. Mrs. Williams

    June 18, 2015 at 5:50 am

    Hello my name is Kay and currently I attend college online my major is in the Medical industry.I was wondering what would be the best ultrbook or laptop for me? My main focus is school so I want it to be able to handle all my work and in my free time be able to watch movies listen to music. Which ultrabook or laptop do you prefer? Weight is not an issue.

    • Andrei Girbea

      June 18, 2015 at 10:05 am

      Hi Kay. You have to pick based on what you prefer (scree-size, battery life, design, keyboard-quality, performance, etc) and budget. Try to narrow down your options with the help of all the posts on this site and I can then help with the final decision.

      • Mrs. Williams

        June 22, 2015 at 9:06 pm

        I want it to at least last me 4 years and be good able to handle a lot of multitasking so faster the better. I need at least 2gb memory 250 for my hard drive.Screen size can be between 11 and 14 inches.I want to stay between $500 and $600.Once again weight is not an issue for me and the keyboard I would like backlight but that would be just a perk. Thank you ahead of time for your response.

      • Debashis Hira

        July 21, 2015 at 5:57 am

        For such minimalistic usage profile, what would you say about the HP sstream 11/13 running on Intel Celeron Dual Core processor and even is good for portability.
        All I want to know is, will it able to withstand with such nominal usage profile for 2-3 years down the line? The best thing is its so affordable and runs on full Windows OS. Let me know what are your views on it

        • Andrei Girbea

          July 21, 2015 at 9:59 am

          The HP Streams are decent for what they are: inexpensive Windows laptops made for the most basic of tasks. The Asus X205TA is another option to consider and I’ve reviewed that one here on the site a while ago.

  23. Dhiraj Chamariya

    June 21, 2015 at 1:10 pm

    I am confused about what to buy for me
    whether to buy regular laptop or ultrabook or ipad

  24. Gary goh

    July 8, 2015 at 1:01 pm


    I’m interested to get a Lenovo U31-70 ultra book laptop, I was wondering do you have a review of this ultrabook. My old laptop keyboard aand mouse pad will hang after using the laptop for a while, will ultra book have this same problem of keyboard and mousepad hang after a while ?

  25. Shivam

    July 8, 2015 at 7:22 pm

    Hi. I m going to join my college soon and i want new laptop/ultrabook which can perform heavy task and which should good in typing becoz i have some Programming related subjects.. I m not interested in playing games etc. but the it must be powerful and looks good .! Budget is $1000. Do you guys can recommend me a model or type in which i should look into ! !?

    • Andrei Girbea

      July 10, 2015 at 9:15 am

      Hi Shivam? What screen size are you interested in?

      • Shivam

        July 10, 2015 at 9:30 am

        14-15 ..!

    • Andrei Girbea

      July 10, 2015 at 9:46 am

      Hmmm, I’d get something with a good CPU and as much RAM and possible (at least 8 GB, preferably 16 GB). I have a long list of Broadwell U models in here, try to narrow it down to a few options that you like: http://www.ultrabookreview.com/5165-broadwell-ultrabooks/#a2 and include the Core I7-5500U CPU as you option.

      You could also wait a few weeks for the Broadwell HQ models to pop-out (with HQ series processors), especially since you’re mostly interested in processing power. Those will probably not fit within your budget, but who knows, someone like Acer, Asus or HP might actually have an affordable model.

      • shivam

        July 21, 2015 at 4:01 pm

        hello.. thx for reply… how is dell 15 insprion 7000(i7 with 8gb ram ) series ??

  26. Apurv Adarsh

    July 13, 2015 at 6:38 am

    I am looking to buy a new laptop that can support Virtualization. Since ultrabooks don’t have much hard drive space, can they run two virtual machine simultaneously. My budget is around $1000.

    • Andrei Girbea

      July 13, 2015 at 5:48 pm

      WEll, yes, you can find ultrabooks with 256 GB SSDs within your budget, so space shouldn’t be a problem.

      • Apurv Adarsh

        July 14, 2015 at 4:23 am

        Ultrabooks are light and thin.
        But are they durable?
        Is it early to buy an ultrabook, since there are not much of a variety as compared to notebook?

        • Andrei Girbea

          July 14, 2015 at 7:23 am

          Ultrabooks have been around for a few years and are now mature products, so you shouldn’t worry about that.

  27. SD

    August 2, 2015 at 5:50 am

    Hi! I’m looking for a ultrabook/laptop I can use for school as well as work. I need it to be highly portable as well as powerful for programs such as SPSS and R. I was thinking about the Lenovo Yoga 3 14″. I was just wondering if you could recommend any models for me? Thanks so much!

  28. tina

    November 9, 2015 at 3:07 pm

    Hi Andrei

    i currently have the new macbook but with the 12″ screen i am finding it really it difficult to use with large spreadsheets and also view Cad documents.
    I have been looking at the surface pro 4 but realised that the screen is virtually the same size .. hence the surface book looked like a good option but comes with a hefty price tag.

    I dont need something really fancy as i am not into gaming or designing. However i would like something that is light weight as i work out of 3 different locations on a weekly basis and dont have the capacity for a large screen at each location.

    What would you recommend in this instance.

    thanks in advance.


    • Andrei Girbea

      November 9, 2015 at 11:03 pm

      Perhaps something like the Lenovo Yoga 900 would be a good pick, with a 13-inch screen. It’s a convertible, so can be used as a tablet as well. Lacks a digitizer though, something to consider

      • tina

        November 10, 2015 at 4:32 pm

        Thank you .. would the lenovo think pad 460 be better ? or another lenovo model that has a digitizer?

        • Andrei Girbea

          November 10, 2015 at 4:41 pm

          The 460 looks like a great device from the specs, but it’s not yet out and there aren’t any reviews. It’s on the heavy side for a tablet, so not very comfortable to use.

          • tina

            November 10, 2015 at 5:00 pm

            thanks for your help :)

  29. Maxime

    November 23, 2015 at 5:01 am

    Super helpful post and reviews. If it isn’t too much of your time I would like to ask for help.
    I am looking for a laptop with a very quick response, minimum 8G of RAM and decent processor. I will be multitasking a lot. I would really like a SSD. I will not be gaming, just watch videos, movies and future plans to work on a website. Lots of disk space is optional. 13-15in FHD IPS screen. 1 or 2 USB 3.0 ports. Weight does not matter. My budget is about 600 ideally, 800 max.
    I am looking at the Asus ZenBook UX305, is it a good choice? Any other suggestions?
    Backlit keyboard, HDMI output, battery life and good speakers are optional extras for me.

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